Friday, January 10, 2014

Carolina Gold by Dorothy Love

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (December 10, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 140168761X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401687618


::From the back of the book::
The war is over, but at Fairhaven Plantation, Charlotte's struggle has just begun.
Following her father’s death, Charlotte Fraser returns to Fairhaven, her family’s rice plantation in the South Carolina Lowcountry. With no one else to rely upon, smart, independent Charlotte is determined to resume cultivating the superior strain of rice called Carolina Gold.  But the war has left the plantation in ruins, her father’s former bondsmen are free, and workers and equipment are in short supply.
To make ends meet, Charlotte reluctantly agrees to tutor the two young daughters of her widowed neighbor and heir to Willowood Plantation, Nicholas Betancourt.  Just as her friendship with Nick deepens, he embarks upon a quest to prove his claim to Willowood and sends Charlotte on a dangerous journey that uncovers a long-held family secret, and threatens everything she holds dear.
Inspired by the life of a 19th-century woman rice farmer, Carolina Gold pays tribute to the hauntingly beautiful Lowcountry and weaves together  mystery, romance, and historical detail, bringing to life the story of one young woman’s struggle to restore her ruined world.

::My Review::
I have to admit I loved Charlotte. She was a very admirable woman whom I could not help take as my favorite character. Concerned about keeping her promise to her father and bring her dreams to life of restoring Fairhaven she also put the needs of others before her own often, and had a very kind heart. No matter what hurdles are thrown her way she perseveres, and stands her own ground. Meek but firm and loving but careful, she is no fool in any matters.
Nicholas was an equally lovable character although he did frustrate me at times. I will admit it is refreshing to see a dedicated father in a historical novel. Most fathers in novels pay little attention to their daughters especially. However Nicholas doted on his daughters and it was easy to picture the love for them. I also love how Nicholas paid little attention to other women and even though he didn't let it publicly be known clearly held Charlotte in his favor among all.

Love is in abundance in this book. And it shows how God really wants us to be on helping thy neighbor and showing love and understanding to all who may need it. This book is the perfect example of life having it's ups and down but keeping your faith rooted in God always. No matter what set backs Charlotte faced, no matter what was going wrong in her restoring her family plantation she kept her faith and accepted what was. She still held to hope and she strives to find the truth of matters. She is a careful planner and a wonderful example of great women everywhere. 
The scenes in the story are all very easy to picture and I was swept away in this novel. Historic details were right on point and I felt as if I was right there with the characters throughout. I couldn't wait to see what was happening next, and felt as if I was there through all of it.
There were many interesting characters in this book, and my only complaint was that it had to end. I liked to epilogue at the end and it was nice to see how a few things ended up for Charlotte although a little insight into the other characters would have been equally as nice. Especially Nicholas's young girls. Still I loved this book immensely, and if you love historical fiction then this is a book for you.
In a time when women were not seen fit to run their own plantation Charlotte did all she could and cared not what anyone thought. A wonderful read!

Here's a little preview for all of you who are curious to get reading it yourself. :)


This book is available in:  PAPERBACK   KINDLE   NOOK



Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of the book mentioned above from Thomas Nelson in exchange for my unbiased review. All opinions expressed are solely my own.

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